Serves the Commercial Small Fleet Market of 10 – 50 Vehicles

New MPG Estimates to be Adjusted for 'Real World'

January 12, 2006

The EPA will announce new testing standards for the way it calculates fuel economy for new cars and trucks that is expected to knock down mileage for city driving in conventional cars 10 percent to 20 percent and in hybrids up to 30 percent, according to the Detroit Free Press.The new two-step process will begin with 2008 model-year vehicles, when new window stickers are expected to reflect lower mileage results by a set percentage to reflect the drain of air-conditioning and other accessories. The adjustment might reduce the results of city mileage by up to 13 percent.For cars and trucks built in the 2011 model year and beyond, the EPA will propose a larger change to testing that would add three tests currently used to measure emissions to the mileage standard tests, coming up with numbers that will likely be even lower than the previous figures.The new lab tests will involve measuring the vehicle’s emissions in cold weather, while running the air conditioner and under hard acceleration.The newly proposed testing procedures are in response to automakers and consumer advocates who have been calling for the EPA to revamp its tests, which were developed in the ‘70s, to reflect today’s faster highways and congested roads.After the proposed changes are announced, the EPA will have a 90-day public comment period before taking final action.
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