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New Jersey MVC Might Pass Vehicles with Minor Flaws

July 18, 2006

About 130,000 New Jersey drivers whose vehicles fail inspection each year due to minor flaws, such as a cracked windshield or broken parking brake or horn, could get a pass under a proposal being considered by the Motor Vehicle Commission, according to the Associated Press. The state would continue to fail vehicles for serious flaws, such as brake or steering deficiencies deemed likely to cause an accident. Under the proposal, drivers with minor defects would be sent a letter suggesting that they repair the problem but they could still be ticketed if stopped by police. The proposal, which won't be acted on until the fall, could save the state $3.5 million a year in reinspection costs, the Associated Press reports.At a public hearing Monday, the proposal drew criticism from the union representing MVC inspectors. "All the standards we have are on the books for a good reason," says Robert Angelo, a consultant for Local 518 of the Service Employees International Union. He told The Star-Ledger of Newark that the new rules would reduce volume at inspection stations enough that 100 of his 600 members could be laid off. Representatives of 1,400 service station owners who do state inspections for a fee also said the new regulations would cost them business.
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