Serves the Commercial Small Fleet Market of 10 – 50 Vehicles

The Deadliest Professions in the U.S.

December 7, 2006

For those involved in the transportation industry, just going to work is getting more and more dangerous.Despite increasingly strict road safety laws and regulations, fatal highway incidents remain the most frequent type of fatal occupational injury, accounting for 1,428 worker deaths in 2005 according to the U.S. Department of Labor and reported at Forbes.com. Highway crashes account for one fourth of all work-related deaths, with most of these attributed to “road departures.” The high incidence of road departures is an indicator of poor road conditions and of drivers operating vehicles while tired or influenced by other circumstances that impair decision-making or reaction abilities.While the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics report shows a decline in workplace fatalities, the incidence of highway deaths is still increasing – a steady trend over the past dozen years. Since 1994, overall workplace deaths have declined 14 percent, while highway deaths have risen 6 percent.The Deadliest Jobs in America:Fishers and related workersTotal Fatalities: 48Rate per 100,000 workers: 118.4Logging WorkersTotal Fatalities: 80Rate per 100,000 workers: 92.9Aircraft Pilots and Flight EngineersTotal Fatalities: 81Rate per 100,000 workers: 66.9Structural Iron and Steel WorkersTotal Fatalities: 35Rate per 100,000 workers: 55.6Refuse and Recyclable CollectorsTotal Fatalities: 32Rate per 100,000 workers: 43.8Farmers and RanchersTotal Fatalities: 341Rate per 100,000 workers: 41.1Electrical Power Line Repairers & InstallersTotal Fatalities: 36Rate per 100,000 workers: 32.7Drivers/Sales and Truck DriversTotal Fatalities: 993Rate per 100,000 workers: 29.1Agricultural WorkersTotal Fatalities: 176Rate per 100,000 workers: 23.2Construction WorkersTotal Fatalities: 339Rate per 100,000 workers: 22.7
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