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NYC to Test Ban on Curbside Deliveries

October 26, 2017

New York Police Department’s Traffic Enforcement Agents will be on hand to enforce moving and parking violations, double parking, and off-route trucks as the city experiments with curbside delivery restrictions to help ease traffic. Photo via NYC Office of the Mayor.
New York Police Department’s Traffic Enforcement Agents will be on hand to enforce moving and parking violations, double parking, and off-route trucks as the city experiments with curbside delivery restrictions to help ease traffic. Photo via NYC Office of the Mayor.

In an effort to decrease congestion and traffic in New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio is piloting a program that will restrict access to curbside deliveries during peak hours in three of the city’s most congested corridors, according to an announcement from the mayor’s office.

Beginning in January, NYC will ban curbside loading and unloading on both sides of the street in the pilot areas during peak hours, from 7 to 10 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m.

However, deliveries to off-street docks, as well as the expedited pick up and drop off of passengers will still be allowed.

The pilot is slated to last six months, at which point the city will evaluate its effectiveness and decide whether or not to expand the rule.

Continuous curb moving lanes are also being created in 11 key crosstown streets in Manhattan’s Central Business District. Deliveries will typically be accepted on one side of the street, while the other will be marked for no stopping from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

New York Police Department’s Traffic Enforcement Agents will be on hand to enforce moving and parking violations, double parking, and off-route trucks.

The city will also be expanding its off-hour delivery program for businesses that are interested in receiving deliveries during less busy times.

In addition to limiting and restricting curb access, de Blasio’s office is expanding “block-the-box” enforcement to reduce intersection gridlock. NYC Department of Transportation will install special markings and signage to help prevent vehicles from entering intersections without sufficient space on the other side.

NYC is also partnering with the Metropolitan Transit Authority, the NY DOT, and the Port Authority to help reduce congestion and choke points on areas and highways outside the city’s jurisdiction.

While restricting curbside access is set to begin in January, the mayor's office was not available to clarify if the other restrictions would begin at that time as well.

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  1. 1. COURTNEY ALLEYNE [ October 27, 2017 @ 06:54AM ]

    As a long time resident and commerscial sales rep for Ford in NYC I think this is going to be interesting. although I firmly believe that if they worked at reducing commuter traffic instead of limiting truck deliveries they would see a bigger and better return on traffic and pollution reduction. there is no reason to allow private cars in the city with out paying for the privilege. if you already live in the most problematic areas ok. but those coming in to work and visit should be charged a toll and those who have vehicles and live in areas buy a permit or must use parking garages.

 

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